In the Media

Graphika has been featured by news outlets all over the world. Here is a selection of coverage:

June 7, 2019

INSIDER SPOTLIGHT Explorers of the cybersocial terrain: How Graphika is making sense of social media

Built in NYC

Our rapidly growing team was featured on Built In NYC's Insider Spotlight. Showcasing a day in the life of three unique employees, this in-depth piece gives curious readers and job seekers the chance to explore what it's like to work at Graphika. 

Read the Full Story Here

August 1, 2018

U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence: Foreign Influence on Social Media

C-SPAN

Graphika Founder and CEO, John Kelly, Ph.D was invited to provide his expert testimony on foreign interference in the U.S. presidential election before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.
Watch the broadcast here.

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How Russian Trolls Weaponized Social Media

Interview: John Kelly, Ph.D, CEO of Graphika on Andrea Mitchell Reports

U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence: Foreign Influence on Social Media

Graphika: interview with CEO John Kelly

Attack on Democracy

INSIDER SPOTLIGHT Explorers of the cybersocial terrain: How Graphika is making sense of social media

(Built in NYC, June 7, 2019)

Our rapidly growing team was featured on Built In NYC's Insider Spotlight. Showcasing a day in the life of three unique employees, this in-depth piece gives curious readers and job seekers the chance to explore what it's like to work at Graphika. 

Read the Full Story Here

How Russian Trolls Are Using American Businesses as Their Weapons

(Inc., May 1, 2019)

A co-author of a recent report on Russian propaganda tactics for the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Kelly has become one of the world's foremost experts on the subject.

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Fake account network massively pro-Duterte – report

(Rappler, April 29, 2019)

While Facebook conducts its own investigations, they also rely on outside help from the intelligence community, journalists and other technical experts. In the Gabunada case, US-based Graphika was tasked with an independent analysis of the takedown to provide more details and share insights.

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When it comes to social media manipulation, we’re our own worst enemy

(The Washington Post, April 29, 2019)

In a new opinion essay for the Washington Post, Graphika's CEO, Dr. John Kelly advocates for online authenticity as a foundation for preventing foreign and domestic political manipulation.

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Did Twitter Keep Tabs on Journalists' Political Leanings?

(Gizmodo, April 29, 2019)

Gizmodo spoke extensively with one of that study’s co-authors, Camille Francois, who confirmed Graphika’s work had not examined the follow relationships between journalists of varying political appetites on Twitter. She could not recall any public academic study that had.

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How Russian Trolls Weaponized Social Media

(MSNBC, April 14, 2019)

A Russian troll farm in St Petersburg latched onto wedge issues in America—race, immigration, gun control—and spread disinformation around them online to sow discord in America. The goal was to get Americans off their computers and onto the streets.

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U.S. Disrupted Russian Trolls on Day of November Election

(The Moscow Times, February 27, 2019)

A report, by an Oxford University team working with analytical firm Graphika, said Russian trolls urged African-Americans to boycott the 2016 election or to follow wrong voting procedures, while also encouraging right-wing voters to be more confrontational.

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There’s a way to know if Russia threw the election to Trump

(The Washington Post, January 18, 2019)

John Kelly of the data-analysis firm Graphika insists that the Russians were sophisticated enough to tailor their messages to key groups — such as African Americans, who were bombarded with social media posts designed to demotivate them from voting.

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It's Past Time For A National Data Privacy Law

(Forbes, January 18, 2019)

According to Oxford University’s Computational Propaganda Project and Graphika, which prepared a new report, “this strategy is not an invention for politics and foreign intrigue, it is consistent with techniques used in digital marketing.”

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How the Russians attacked America's democracy

(USA Today, December 19, 2018)

A Russian company with ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin used the biggest names in American technology to spread disinformation, poison the electorate and enrage voters.

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Russia Rejects Reports Alleging Extensive US Election Meddling

(Voice of America, December 18, 2018)

The size and scope of Russia's efforts to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election was far more extensive and thorough than previously understood, according to two newly released reports.

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Codebook - news recap

(Axios, December 18, 2018)

In the United States, Russia's social media disinformation campaigns are often seen as an election-tampering issue. There's a good chance we'll spend 2019 talking about propaganda as something we have to prepare for before the 2020 election.

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Russian disinformation campaign included 'pro-Jill Stein sentiments'

(The Hill, December 18, 2018)

Russia's online disinformation campaign included messaging that supported 2016 Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein, according to a new report prepared for the Senate Intelligence Committee.

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New Senate Reports Are an Indictment of the White House's Inaction ...

(Slate, December 18, 2018)

The Senate Intelligence Committee has just released two new reports on Russian disinformation, revealing in unusually rich detail the scope of Russia’s interference not only in the 2016 U.S. presidential election but also in our day-to-day democratic dialogue since.

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Russian Trolls Used ‘Digital Marketing Best Practices’ to Sow Discord, Senate Reports Find

(AdWeek, December 18, 2018)

The Russian troll farm responsible for running disinformation campaigns intended to influence the 2016 presidential election reached more people on Instagram than on Facebook, and Russian-government-linked accounts are still spreading disinformation on both of the platforms at even higher rates than before the 2016 presidential election.

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Senate-commissioned reports show scale of Russian misinformation campaign

(Axios, December 17, 2018)

Two outside research groups used data obtained from Silicon Valley giants by the Senate Intelligence Committee to paint a sweeping picture of Russia’s online disinformation efforts both before and after the 2016 presidential election in reports released Monday.

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Voter Suppression and Racial Targeting: In Facebook’s and Twitter’s Words

(The New York Times, December 17, 2018)

A report submitted to a Senate committee about Russian attempts to influence the 2016 election says that social media companies made misleading or evasive claims about whether the efforts tried to discourage voting or targeted African-Americans on their platforms.

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How Russian Trolls Boosted Conservative News Outlets in the United States

(MotherJones, December 17, 2018)

Russian internet trolls helped expand the reach of conservative media outlets as part of a Kremlin campaign to influence US politics and sow social discord, according to a new report commissioned by the Senate Intelligence Committee.

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Russian 2016 Influence Operation Targeted African-Americans on Social Media

(The New York Times, December 17, 2018)

The Russian influence campaign on social media in the 2016 election made an extraordinary effort to target African-Americans, used an array of tactics to try to suppress turnout among Democratic voters and unleashed a blizzard of activity on Instagram that rivaled or exceeded its posts on Facebook

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Russian interference in the election was worse than we thought

(Los Angeles Times, December 17, 2018)

Two studies released by the Senate Intelligence Committee provide shocking specifics about the scope and sophistication of the effort by the Internet Research Agency, a Russian business linked to the Kremlin, to spread manipulative content online.

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Massive scale of Russian election trolling revealed in draft Senate report

(ARS Technica, December 17, 2018)

A report prepared for the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) concludes that the activities of Russia's Internet Research Agency (IRA) leading up to and following the 2016 US presidential election were crafted to specifically help the Republican Party and Donald Trump.

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How Russia Hacked US Politics With Instagram Marketing

(Foreign Policy, December 17, 2018)

In June 2017, some eight months after the election of Donald Trump as U.S. president, Kremlin operatives running a digital interference campaign in American politics scored a viral success with a post on Instagram.

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Key takeaways from new reports on Russian disinformation

(Fox Business, December 17, 2018)

Russians seeking to influence U.S. elections through social media had their eyes on Instagram and the black community. These were among the findings in two reports released Monday by the Senate intelligence committee.

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Russian operatives were promoting sex toys on Instagram to sow discord in the US

(Quartz, December 17, 2018)

Two reports produced by independent researchers for the US Senate Intelligence Committee show that Instagram was a much more significant tool in the hands of Russian operatives trying to influence US politics than previously thought—and was at times potentially more powerful than Facebook.

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Silicon Valley may have done 'bare minimum' to help Russia investigation

(CNN, December 17, 2018)

The Senate Intelligence Committee has been advised that social media companies might have provided the "bare minimum" amount of data to aid the panel's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, according to a person familiar with a report commissioned by the committee.

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We Made It Easy for the Russians

(Esquire, December 17, 2018)

A new report states very plainly that the Russian government designed this sweeping program specifically to help the Trump campaign, and that it was based on a thoroughgoing analysis of how easily Americans can be duped when it comes to electing a president.

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How Russia exploited racial tensions in America during the 2016 elections

(Vox, December 17, 2018)

More than two years after the 2016 elections, media outlets and academics are still discovering the extent of Russian disinformation campaigns aimed at American voters.

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Russia disinformation report calls out big tech

(Seeking Alpha, December 17, 2018)

A new report prepared for the Senate highlights the "belated and uncoordinated response" of tech companies to the Russian disinformation campaign during the 2016 election.

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10 things you need to know today

(The Week, December 17, 2018)

The study by Oxford University's Computational Propaganda Project and network analysis firm Graphika found that Russians working at the Internet Research Agency separated Americans into key interest groups and targeted them with messages.

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Here's How Russian Trolls Turned Social Media Into a Weapon

(Gizmodo, December 17, 2018)

Two new independent studies commissioned by the Senate Intelligence Committee were made public, providing the most in-depth look at online Russian interference in the 2016 election to date.

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Yes, Russian Trolls Helped Elect Trump

(The New York Times, December 17, 2018)

Russian propaganda had about 187 million engagements on Instagram, reaching at least 20 million users, and 76.5 million engagements on Facebook, reaching 126 million people. Approximately 1.4 million people engaged with tweets associated with the Internet Research Agency.

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How Russia Harvested American Rage to Reshape U.S. Politics

(The New York Times, October 9, 2018)

John Kelly, Ph.D, Graphika’s founder and CEO contributed analysis and expertise for this New York Times piece revealing the consistent nature of Russian social media manipulation strategy across different social network platforms.

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Here’s Proof that Russian-Backed Accounts Pushed the Nike Boycott

(Wired, September 27, 2018)

Graphika’s John Kelly, Ph.D contributed expert opinion about ongoing Russian disinformation campaigns that helped to amplify the anti-Nike sentiment during the boycott of the brand following the announcement of Colin Kaepernick as the face of a major Nike advertising campaign.

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Interview: John Kelly, Ph.D, CEO of Graphika on Andrea Mitchell Reports

(MSNBC, August 2, 2018)

After delivering his testimony on Russian foreign influence on social media to the Senate Select Intelligence Committee, Graphika CEO and founder, John Kelly, Ph.D visited Andrea Mitchell Reports (MSNBC) in Washington, D.C. on August 2nd, 2018.

Watch the Full Interview Here

U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence: Foreign Influence on Social Media

(C-SPAN, August 1, 2018)

Graphika Founder and CEO, John Kelly, Ph.D was invited to provide his expert testimony on foreign interference in the U.S. presidential election before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.
Watch the broadcast here.

Read the Full Story Here

A Global Guide to State-Sponsored Trolling

(Bloomberg, July 19, 2018)

Graphika founder and CEO, John Kelly, Ph.D contributed analysis and expert perspective for this piece from Bloomberg exploring the global rise of government sponsored interference in elections by means of online manipulation and disinformation.

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How an Ex-YouTube Insider Investigated its Secret Algorithm

(The Guardian, February 2, 2018)

Graphika discovered over 513,000 Twitter accounts tweeted links to one or more YouTube-recommended videos that were boosted by vigorous social media campaigns leading up to the 2016 election, involving thousands of accounts controlled by political operatives, including a large number of bots.

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This former Google exec talked to the social media trolls the Russians paid to influence elections — here’s what she learned

(CNBC, January 19, 2018)

Camille François, Graphika’s Chief Innovation Officer, shared first hand accounts of the stories of real troll farm workers and her own experience co-authoring a landmark report on Russian electoral influence operations for the Senate Select Intelligence Committee.

Watch the Full Interview Here

The Insanity of NBA All-Star Voting

(ESPN, February 16, 2017)

Graphika sifted through more than 5 million tweets on behalf of ESPN, revealing a number of interesting findings about NBA All-Star voting, including 10 hyperactive bot accounts voting for Kawhi Leonard about 1,000 times per day.

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